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Post-proposal reading list

I passed my thesis proposal!

As I've spoken to more and more people about my work, I'm learning about a bunch of exciting related systems, and now I have a big pile of reading to do! Here's what's currently on my stack:

The Oz Project: Bob Harper and Roger Dannenberg brought to my attention a defunct CMU interactive fiction project called Oz, which efforts had some brief extra-academic fame through the Fa├žade game. I've printed out the following papers which seem most relevant to my work:

Hap: A Reactive, Adaptive Architecture for Agents
A. Bryan Loyall and Joseph Bates. Technical Report CMU-CS-91-147, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, June 1991.

An Architecture for Action, Emotion, and Social Behavior
Joseph Bates, A. Bryan Loyall, and W. Scott Reilly. Techical Report CMU-CS-92-144, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. May 1992. Also appearing in Artificial Social Systems: Fourth European Workshop on Modeling Autonomous Agents in a Multi-Agent World, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1994.


Adam Smith's work: I met Mike Treanor when he interviewed at CMU, and he pointed me in the direction of a few of his colleagues at UCSC working on logic programming for games prototyping, specifically Adam Smith. It turns out that his advisor was Michael Mateas, one of the members of the Oz project. I'm reading:

Bits of his dissertation, Mechanizing Exploratory Game Design

Answer Set Programming for Procedural Content Generation: A Design Space Approach

LUDOCORE: A Logical Game Engine for Modeling Videogames

Towards Knowledge-Oriented Creativity Support in Game Design


Kim Dung Dang's work: My external committee member Gwenn Bosser recommended to me the recent thesis work of Kim Dung Dang, who is also using linear logic for games, specifically interactive storytelling applications. I'm reading:

Kim Dung Dang, Ronan Champagnat, Michel Augeraud: A Methodology to Validate Interactive Storytelling Scenarios in Linear Logic. T. Edutainment 10: 53-82 (2013)

Kim Dung Dang, Steve Hoffmann, Ronan Champagnat, Ulrike Spierling: How Authors Benefit from Linear Logic in the Authoring Process of Interactive Storyworlds. ICIDS 2011: 249-260

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